How to do kitchener’s stitch on 2×2 ribbing

1-img_5818

In this tutorial, I want to show you how to graft rib stitches together using the kitchener’s stitch. More precisely, I will show you how to graft 2×2 ribbed stitches together.

1-IMG_20161119_155905.jpg

In 2015, I bought the “Take Heart” book, which includes many wonderful patterns by Fiona Alice. This fall, I finally managed to knit the Queensland Beach headband, which you can also see on the book’s cover.

In the end, I had to graft stitches together knit in 2×2 ribbing. However, I failed to perfectly carry out the kitchener’s stitch, so that my headband sadly has a clearly visible seam in the back. Of course, I love my headband nevertheless, especially as small flaws are common in knitting and render every handknit piece unique. However, I always seek to improve my knitting skills and love new challenges – thus, I gave 2×2 ribbed kitchener’s stitch a new chance and made a tutorial about it. I hope that it encourages you to give this techniue a try and helps you to finish your Queensland Beach headbands flawlessly.

What you need:

2-img_5787

  • the knitted pieces you want to join, with the stitches still on the needles
  • a piece of yarn, desirably the same yarn you used for your knitting to make the seam invisible – I recommend to use a piece of yarn that is at least four times as long as the knitted pieces you want to join after stretching them out a bit
  • a tapestry needle

Setup:

  • First, place the knitting needles so that the tips face the same direction and the wrong sides of the knit pieces face each other
  • On the front needle: go through the first stitch as if to purl, pulling the yarn through the stitch, but leaving the stitch on the needle
  • On the back needle: go through the first stitch as if to knit, pulling the yarn through the stitch, but leaving the stitch on the needle

Step-by-Step kitchener’s stitch:

First, I will illustrate the procedure for knit stitches. Second, I will tell you when to switch to the instructions for purl stitches. Finally, I will illustrate the procedure for purl stitches. If your ribbing starts with purled stitches, you can either place the knit pieces on each other so that their right sides face. Or you can first follow the instructions for purl stitches and then switch to the instructions for knit stitches afterwards. In any case, please be careful not to pull your yarn too tight, so that your grafted row resembles your usual knitting tension as closely as possible.

Repeat the following steps for all knit stitches, until your ribbing switches to purl-stitches:

  • On the front needle: go through the first stitch as if to knit and pull it off the needle; then, go through the next stitch as if to purl and pull the yarn through the stitch, but leave the stitch on the needle
  • On the back needle: go through the first stitch as if to purl and pull it off the neddle; then, go through the next stitch as if to knit, pulling the yarn through the stitch, but leaving it on the needle
  • On the front needle: go through first stitch on the needle as if to knit and pull it off the needle; then, go through the next stitch as if to purl, pulling the yarn through the stitch, but leaving it on the needle
  • On the back needle: go through the first stitch as if to knit and pull it off the needle; then, go through the next stitch as if to purl, pulling the yarn through the stitch, but leaving it on the needle

1-Collagen.jpg

As already said, repeat these steps until you reach the first purl stitch. When you pull one knit stitch off the needle and have to thread the piece of yarn through the first purl stitch, you might find yourself wondering whether to follow the instructions for purl or for knit stitches. The answer is: just follow the instructions for knit stitches. You only need to switch to the purl instructions once the first stitches on both needles are purl stitches.

Repeat the following steps for all purl stitches, until your ribbing switches back to knit stitches:

  • On the front needle: go through the first stitch as if to knit and pull it off the needle; then, go through the next stitch as if to purl, pulling the yarn through the stitch, but leaving it on the needle
  • On the back needle: go through the first stitch as if to knit and pull it off the needle; then, go through the next stitch as if to purl, pulling the yarn through the stitch, but leaving it on the needle
  • On the front needle: go through the first stitch as if to knit and pull it off the needle; then, go through the next stitch as if to purl, pulling the yarn through the stitch, but leaving it on the needle
  • On the back needle: go through the first stitch as if to purl and pull it off the needle; then, go through the next stitch as if to knit, pulling the yarn through the stitch, but leaving it on the needle

1-004_tutorial-2x2-maschenstich1

Continue to switch back and forth between the instructions for purl and knit stitches until you have no more stitches left on your needles. Hopefully, you’ll find yourself with a satisfying result 😉

Für die deutsche Version dieses Beitrags, klicke bitte hier.

Advertisements

One thought on “How to do kitchener’s stitch on 2×2 ribbing

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s